Zenzr

[Official] Ubuntu, Mint, or something else? The Linux Hangout Q&A

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Whenever I have installed a new Distro (mint 17, Xubuntu, or Ubuntu) I've had to use a ethernet connection to download a driver so wireless can work. Kinda weird but it works...

Must have a broadcom wifi card, for most of them you either need firmware-b43-installer or bcmwl-kernel-source to get them working.

Some of the newer USB wifi cards are a nightmare, the model numbers start with WNA or WDNA and there isn't a linux driver for them and using ndiswrapper with XP drivers is a poor solution

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I think it is broadcom. So far my only issue is terrible battery life. with screen brightness and key backlight off I got 20% battery usage in my 45 min class. Granted that's not bad, but still, in OSX I can get 4ish hours of screen on time. 

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Decided to play with some linux when I got bored at home.

 

This is my VM with 16gb of ram. :D

 

post-7207-0-01250000-1412809367_thumb.pn

Edited by Zenzr

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Well I ran the newest Ubuntu(14.10) for a month or so and well, I'm back to Linux Mint. 17.1 Came out recently and I can say that I couldnt be happier. There were bugs on 14.10(yes I am aware its not a stable release but....) and Linux mint 17.1 is now for sure my favorite distro. 

 

 

post-7005-0-16253100-1418740005_thumb.pn

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Has anyone tried running a Linux distro (mint or Ubuntu) from a USB stick or something similar? I've got a MacBook Pro Retina that I bought with only a 256 gb ssd & I'd like to save space. I was thinking of using either a USB 3 thumb drive or one of those Transcend JetDrive Lite 330 drives. Then just boot from one of them.

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Has anyone tried running a Linux distro (mint or Ubuntu) from a USB stick or something similar? I've got a MacBook Pro Retina that I bought with only a 256 gb ssd & I'd like to save space. I was thinking of using either a USB 3 thumb drive or one of those Transcend JetDrive Lite 330 drives. Then just boot from one of them.

I had Ubuntu installed on my ext hdd which was usb 3.0. It worked pretty well. I would not rely on it for gaming or heavy computing, but just getting a feel for things it worked really well. 

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Thanks. My install probably would be just for general computing, so no problem there. I used to compile CM roms with my Linux vm, so I know the heavy computing side of it & how slow it can be. I would either partition the ssd with a dual boot of Mint or use my main OS X Yosemite to compile roms today to get the full benefit of the ssd in performance.

I was also looking to try the Mac lookalike Linux called elementary. Any one try it lately?

Edited by grad

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Thanks. My install probably would be just for general computing, so no problem there. I used to compile CM roms with my Linux vm, so I know the heavy computing side of it & how slow it can be. I would either partition the ssd with a dual boot of Mint or use my main OS X Yosemite to compile roms today to get the full benefit of the ssd in performance.

I was also looking to try the Mac lookalike Linux called elementary. Any one try it lately?

Elementary is good. Kind of basic, but you can add just about anything you want since it's based off of Ubuntu. 

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Thanks. My install probably would be just for general computing, so no problem there. I used to compile CM roms with my Linux vm, so I know the heavy computing side of it & how slow it can be. I would either partition the ssd with a dual boot of Mint or use my main OS X Yosemite to compile roms today to get the full benefit of the ssd in performance.

I was also looking to try the Mac lookalike Linux called elementary. Any one try it lately?

Elementary is good. Kind of basic, but you can add just about anything you want since it's based off of Ubuntu.
So is mint;) lol. I haven't tried elementary but it looks really cool.

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I mainly run mint from a flash drive only. When I want I pull it and carry my distro with me to any computer. The only draw back is the lilo bout loader Linux flash drive creator... Will not use the full nano flash drive space...

If you go this route get a decent flash drive. I had one drive that, wish my mind/memory was still sharp maybe I am to tired, it didn't work on this one flash drive, was slow and pokie. Now the new flash drive it runs fast and smooth in persistent mode.

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I'm actually impressed. Granted this is a really old game. But I'm getting almost the same FPS as I do in windows.

 

 

attachicon.gifa.png

I ran Enemy Territory on Ubuntu. The only problem was using custom cfg's. I could never figure out how to load them in Linux

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Thanks. My install probably would be just for general computing, so no problem there. I used to compile CM roms with my Linux vm, so I know the heavy computing side of it & how slow it can be. I would either partition the ssd with a dual boot of Mint or use my main OS X Yosemite to compile roms today to get the full benefit of the ssd in performance.

I was also looking to try the Mac lookalike Linux called elementary. Any one try it lately?

Elementary is good. Kind of basic, but you can add just about anything you want since it's based off of Ubuntu. 

 

Is Elementary still using the 3.2 kernel?

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Thanks. My install probably would be just for general computing, so no problem there. I used to compile CM roms with my Linux vm, so I know the heavy computing side of it & how slow it can be. I would either partition the ssd with a dual boot of Mint or use my main OS X Yosemite to compile roms today to get the full benefit of the ssd in performance.

I was also looking to try the Mac lookalike Linux called elementary. Any one try it lately?

Elementary is good. Kind of basic, but you can add just about anything you want since it's based off of Ubuntu.

Is Elementary still using the 3.2 kernel?
I'm not sure. I'll have to check.

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I ran win 7/Ubuntu for ever.

 

Once I get an external to move all my stuff on my internal D drive, I'm going to use that to o back to Linux. Never ran Mint but after reading the thread, I'll have to run it. I got tired of Ubuntu,. tbh

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I understand. I like all three. I run a combo of all 3 usually. Well not so much W7 anymore but Windows and Ubuntu/Mint.

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Was searching around the internet for linux related things and stumbled on this. What do you guys think?

 

Link

 

Specs:


Quad Core Linux computer is now $35.00. 
Don't put up with the slow single core computer anymore. 
If you are considering a tiny computer for general purpose computing, software development or as a project platform, 
the ODROID-C1 will give you a lot more satisfaction and fun with incredible performance for a very low price.
You can get more information from ODROID Magazine
* Amlogic ARM® Cortex®-A5(ARMv7) 1.5Ghz quad core CPUs 
* Mali™-450 MP2 GPU (OpenGL ES 2.0/1.1 enabled for Linux and Android)
* 1Gbyte DDR3 SDRAM
* Gigabit Ethernet
* 40pin GPIOs
* eMMC4.5 HS200 Flash Storage slot / UHS-1 SDR50 MicroSD Card slot
* USB 2.0 Host x 4, USB OTG x 1,
* Infrared(IR) Receiver
* Ubuntu 14.04 or Android KitKat

Edited by Zenzr

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As long as you are aware of the ARM processor and the (possibly) limited software selection.

Oh I know. It's a mobile based PC. The ARM processor is so it can run Android natively. 

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As long as you are aware of the ARM processor and the (possibly) limited software selection.

Oh I know. It's a mobile based PC. The ARM processor is so it can run Android natively.
It is like, what I think the name was, raspberry pi. There are many of those little PC's out there. At least there used to be. The majority of them run android but if you can find a Linux distro to load it works just fine.

This is an old article but tasks about this replacing the desktop. http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/can-a-50-mini-pc-replace-your-desktop/

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As long as you are aware of the ARM processor and the (possibly) limited software selection.

Oh I know. It's a mobile based PC. The ARM processor is so it can run Android natively.
It is like, what I think the name was, raspberry pi. There are many of those little PC's out there. At least there used to be. The majority of them run android but if you can find a Linux distro to load it works just fine.

This is an old article but tasks about this replacing the desktop. http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/can-a-50-mini-pc-replace-your-desktop/

 

Basically it's an upgraded Raspberry Pi. More or less. Ubuntu should work just fine, along with any other major distro. 

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I noticed the other day, I was using a GPL program on my linux mint17 setup, 4Gb ram and quad core cpu, I extracting some images from a pdf file and the program was only using 1 of the 4 core processors.

Program ran for about 18 hrs to complete the task. It did run with no errors.

I guess where I'm going with this is that it appears that some open programs aren't written to take advantage of multiple cpu's of most all newer hardware.

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